CLMR

this is a side blog for me to collect references in.
1 of 2
animamundifarmacy:

Next time you get sick, skip the trip to the drugstore—help may be as close as your kitchen cupboard. Our grandparents often turned to herbs and spices to ward off common ailments, and these time-tested remedies have proven safe and effective. (If you have a health condition or are already using medication or other treatments, consult your practitioner before use.)Coughs: Thyme contains two constituents (thymol and carvacrol) with expectorant (phlegm-loosening) properties, making it a great choice if you’re suffering from a cough, congestion, sore throat or bronchitis. The herb also has powerful antimicrobial properties. To make thyme tea, steep 1 teaspoon dried thyme (or 1 tablespoon fresh) in 1 cup of water for 10 minutes; strain and drink up to three cups daily.Sinus problems: Try this spicy mixture next time your sinuses feel clogged and painful: Combine 1 cup tomato juice, 1 teaspoon chopped fresh garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cayenne powder and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Warm the mixture and drink slowly.Digestion: Many culinary herbs have carminitive properties, meaning they help relieve gas and bloating. To relieve gas, try chewing 1/2 teaspoon of fennel, caraway or dill seeds, or drinking a post-meal cup of tea made from their seeds. For general indigestion or upset stomach, try a cup or two of peppermint tea.Nausea: Keep ginger on hand to safely and effectively relieve nausea. It also helps prevent motion sickness. You can make a tea from 2 teaspoons of fresh grated ginger per cup of boiling water, or drink ginger ale that contains real ginger, such as Reed’s.Cancer prevention: Many herbs are great sources of cancer-preventive antioxidants and should be added liberally to the diet. The U.S. Department of Agriculture found cinnamon, cloves and oregano to have especially high antioxidant capacities. Green tea contains a polyphenol called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which may help prevent a wide variety of cancers, especially those of the lung, breast, stomach and skin. In the Iowa Women’s Health Study, increased garlic consumption was associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, can prevent or kill several types of cancer cells.Joint pain and arthritis: Turmeric’s active ingredient, curcumin, has been shown to ease arthritis pain and have anti-inflammatory properties. Use the herb liberally in cooking—it’s a great addition to soups, sauces, stir-fries and vegetables.Bruises: Speed the healing process with this folk remedy: Cut a lemon in half and rub the pulpy side over the bruise once an hour for several hours. Avoid cuts or broken skin.Urinary tract infections: Cranberry juice—and the dried berries and extract—prevent bacteria from sticking to the bladder wall. Drink at least three cups of unsweetened juice (diluted in apple juice for flavor), or eat one or two handfuls of dried cranberries daily.High cholesterol and heart health: Many garlic studies have shown that the herb reduces cholesterol, heart disease and heart attack risk. Eat approximately one clove a day, raw or lightly cooked. Fenugreek seeds contain substances that help the body excrete cholesterol. The herb also lowers triglycerides and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels.High blood sugar: A 2005 study of Type 2 diabetics found that cinnamon can help reduce blood sugar. Use it liberally in cooking, or make cinnamon tea: Pour 1 cup boiling water over ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon in a muslin bag. Steep, covered, for 10 minutes. Drink up to three cups daily.Boost Your Immunity Cold and flu season is headed our way. While we can’t entirely avoid the onslaught of bacteria, viruses and other germs capable of wreaking havoc in our bodies, we can rev up our immune systems so we are better equipped to fight off whatever bugs try to invade.Echinacea contains a number of antioxidant compounds and immune-stimulating constituents that can help the immune system fight off illness. According to a University of Florida study, echinacea stimulates threefold the activity of infection-fighting immune-system cells. For prevention, follow the label directions or use a dropperful of tincture twice daily. Up the dosage at the first sign of illness.Garlic is a potent antioxidant packed with antimicrobial compounds such as cancer-fighting sulfur and the immune-boosting mineral selenium. Aim to eat one raw or lightly cooked garlic clove daily.Green tea, Asian ginseng and eleuthero also offer a hefty dose of antioxidants. In studies, green tea has shown the ability to boost immune function. Drink several cups daily. Asian ginseng improved immune response according to one Italian study conducted at the University of Milan, and the results of a German study demonstrated a significant increase in the number of immune cells in healthy volunteers taking eleuthero.

animamundifarmacy:

Next time you get sick, skip the trip to the drugstore—help may be as close as your kitchen cupboard. Our grandparents often turned to herbs and spices to ward off common ailments, and these time-tested remedies have proven safe and effective. (If you have a health condition or are already using medication or other treatments, consult your practitioner before use.)

Coughs: Thyme contains two constituents (thymol and carvacrol) with expectorant (phlegm-loosening) properties, making it a great choice if you’re suffering from a cough, congestion, sore throat or bronchitis. The herb also has powerful antimicrobial properties. To make thyme tea, steep 1 teaspoon dried thyme (or 1 tablespoon fresh) in 1 cup of water for 10 minutes; strain and drink up to three cups daily.

Sinus problems: Try this spicy mixture next time your sinuses feel clogged and painful: Combine 1 cup tomato juice, 1 teaspoon chopped fresh garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cayenne powder and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Warm the mixture and drink slowly.

Digestion: Many culinary herbs have carminitive properties, meaning they help relieve gas and bloating. To relieve gas, try chewing 1/2 teaspoon of fennel, caraway or dill seeds, or drinking a post-meal cup of tea made from their seeds. For general indigestion or upset stomach, try a cup or two of peppermint tea.

Nausea: Keep ginger on hand to safely and effectively relieve nausea. It also helps prevent motion sickness. You can make a tea from 2 teaspoons of fresh grated ginger per cup of boiling water, or drink ginger ale that contains real ginger, such as Reed’s.

Cancer prevention: Many herbs are great sources of cancer-preventive antioxidants and should be added liberally to the diet. The U.S. Department of Agriculture found cinnamon, cloves and oregano to have especially high antioxidant capacities. Green tea contains a polyphenol called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which may help prevent a wide variety of cancers, especially those of the lung, breast, stomach and skin. In the Iowa Women’s Health Study, increased garlic consumption was associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, can prevent or kill several types of cancer cells.

Joint pain and arthritis: Turmeric’s active ingredient, curcumin, has been shown to ease arthritis pain and have anti-inflammatory properties. Use the herb liberally in cooking—it’s a great addition to soups, sauces, stir-fries and vegetables.

Bruises: Speed the healing process with this folk remedy: Cut a lemon in half and rub the pulpy side over the bruise once an hour for several hours. Avoid cuts or broken skin.

Urinary tract infections: Cranberry juice—and the dried berries and extract—prevent bacteria from sticking to the bladder wall. Drink at least three cups of unsweetened juice (diluted in apple juice for flavor), or eat one or two handfuls of dried cranberries daily.

High cholesterol and heart health: Many garlic studies have shown that the herb reduces cholesterol, heart disease and heart attack risk. Eat approximately one clove a day, raw or lightly cooked. Fenugreek seeds contain substances that help the body excrete cholesterol. The herb also lowers triglycerides and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels.

High blood sugar: A 2005 study of Type 2 diabetics found that cinnamon can help reduce blood sugar. Use it liberally in cooking, or make cinnamon tea: Pour 1 cup boiling water over ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon in a muslin bag. Steep, covered, for 10 minutes. Drink up to three cups daily.

Boost Your Immunity 

Cold and flu season is headed our way. While we can’t entirely avoid the onslaught of bacteria, viruses and other germs capable of wreaking havoc in our bodies, we can rev up our immune systems so we are better equipped to fight off whatever bugs try to invade.

Echinacea contains a number of antioxidant compounds and immune-stimulating constituents that can help the immune system fight off illness. According to a University of Florida study, echinacea stimulates threefold the activity of infection-fighting immune-system cells. For prevention, follow the label directions or use a dropperful of tincture twice daily. Up the dosage at the first sign of illness.

Garlic is a potent antioxidant packed with antimicrobial compounds such as cancer-fighting sulfur and the immune-boosting mineral selenium. Aim to eat one raw or lightly cooked garlic clove daily.

Green tea, Asian ginseng and eleuthero also offer a hefty dose of antioxidants. In studies, green tea has shown the ability to boost immune function. Drink several cups daily. Asian ginseng improved immune response according to one Italian study conducted at the University of Milan, and the results of a German study demonstrated a significant increase in the number of immune cells in healthy volunteers taking eleuthero.


Rose Petal Jelly

This subtle jelly is ideal for polite afternoon teas with thinly sliced pieces of bread and butter — it adds a real summer afternoon flavor to the bread.
Ingredients
2 1/2 c. red and/or pink rose petals
1 7/8 c. water
3 c. superfine sugar
1/2 c. white grape juice
1/2 c. red grape juice
2 oz. powdered fruit pectin
2 T. rosewater
Procedure
Trim all the rose petals at the base to remove the white tips. Place the petals, water, and about one-eighth of the sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to stand overnight for the rose fragrance to infuse.
Strain the flowers from the syrup, and put the syrup in a preserving pan or suitable saucepan. Add the grape juices and pectin. Boil hard for 1 minute. Add the rest of the sugar and stir well. Boil the mixture hard for 1 minute more. Remove from heat.
Test for setting — it should make a soft jelly, not a thick jam. Do this by placing a teaspoonful of the hot mixture on a saucer. Leave it to cool; the surface should wrinkle when pushed with a finger. If it is still runny, return the pan to the heat and continue boiling and testing until the jelly sets.
Finally add the rosewater. Ladle the jelly into sterilized glass jars and seal with waxed paper circles and cellophane lids secured with rubber bands. Decorate the tops of the jars with circles of fabric held in place with lengths of ribbon.

Source: The Complete Book of Herbs, ISBN 0-8317-1164-7

Rose Petal Jelly

This subtle jelly is ideal for polite afternoon teas with thinly sliced pieces of bread and butter — it adds a real summer afternoon flavor to the bread.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 c. red and/or pink rose petals
  • 1 7/8 c. water
  • 3 c. superfine sugar
  • 1/2 c. white grape juice
  • 1/2 c. red grape juice
  • 2 oz. powdered fruit pectin
  • 2 T. rosewater

Procedure

  1. Trim all the rose petals at the base to remove the white tips. Place the petals, water, and about one-eighth of the sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to stand overnight for the rose fragrance to infuse.
  2. Strain the flowers from the syrup, and put the syrup in a preserving pan or suitable saucepan. Add the grape juices and pectin. Boil hard for 1 minute. Add the rest of the sugar and stir well. Boil the mixture hard for 1 minute more. Remove from heat.
  3. Test for setting — it should make a soft jelly, not a thick jam. Do this by placing a teaspoonful of the hot mixture on a saucer. Leave it to cool; the surface should wrinkle when pushed with a finger. If it is still runny, return the pan to the heat and continue boiling and testing until the jelly sets.
  4. Finally add the rosewater. Ladle the jelly into sterilized glass jars and seal with waxed paper circles and cellophane lids secured with rubber bands. Decorate the tops of the jars with circles of fabric held in place with lengths of ribbon.

Source: The Complete Book of Herbs, ISBN 0-8317-1164-7

Anonymous asked:
Hello Beth, do you have a spell for getting a specific job? Something with few ingredients? And also something that can make me more confident and charismatic? Thank you so much!

broomstraws:

Purpose: To help you to get a specific job.

You Will Need: Paper. Pen. A coin. String.

Notes: None.

Step One - Write down everything you know about the job. The job title, address, job description, and anything you know about why the job appeals to you. 

Step Two - Place the coin in the middle of the paper and fold the paper up around it. 

Step Three - Tie  the bundle up with three knots, reciting:

I tie in grace and an easy voice. 
I tie in confidence and luck.
I tie myself to the job of my choice. 

If you find out you don’t get the the job (or, if you do and decide you want to leave), simple cut the thread. 

2 weeks ago 79 notes via broomstraws

Pie Correspondences

lavenderwrath:

  • Apple: love, healing, peace
  • Apricot: peace
  • Banana Cream: money
  • Blackberry: money, sex
  • Blueberry: protection
  • Chocolate Cream: money, love
  • Coconut Cream: spirituality
  • Cherry: love
  • Custard: spirituality
  • Key Lime: love, purification
  • Lemon: love, purification
  • Mince: luck, money
  • Peach: love, health, happiness, wisdom
  • Pecan: money
  • Pineapple: love, healing, money, protection
  • Pumpkin: money, happiness, healing
  • Raspberry: happiness, love, protection
  • Rhubarb: protection, love
  • Strawberry: love

FREE PDF SPELL BOOKS

thatwitcheryblog:

I found some books on Witchcraft spells and herbs but I didnt have the money so here’s the free PDF files!

Complete Book of Incense, Oils and Brews

Encyclopedia of Herbs

The Witch’s Master Grimoire

~ Avilynn

Anonymous asked:
I like your powder recipes, but a lot of these ingredients seem like they might be hard to find.

breelandwalker:

I do realize this when I make my postings. The powders are from my own personal collection of recipes and I have a pretty good store of various herbs to choose from, plus local shops and locations for wild harvest.

For my followers who don’t have access to these things, here are some websites where you can find herbs and powders:

plantial:

//general//
What plants are able to grow in my climate?
Caring for a houseplant
Types of soil and plant growth
Identifying plants database
Useful tools for a new gardener
Flowers + their meanings
//for a sick planty//
Common plant diseases
I over- watered my plant
Identifying plant diseases
My plant is wilting
I can’t tell what’s wrong with my plant
//gardens//
Planning a vegetable garden
Garden upkeep tips
Types of fertilizer
5 tips for weeding your garden
//pest control//
Safe, nontoxic pest control tips
Natural methods to deter garden pests
Alternatives to pesticides 
//seasonal flowers//
Plants that flower in winter
The five best flowers for summer gardens
//seasonal fruits + veggies//
What fruits & veggies are in season right now?
//recipes//
Recipes for winter vegetables + fruits
Recipes for summer vegetables
Quick vegetable main dishes 
//holistic//
Surprising uses for plants and flowers
10 Healing herbs and spices
Medicinal flowers
Aroma therapy

plantial:

//general//

//for a sick planty//

//gardens//

//pest control//

//seasonal flowers//

//seasonal fruits + veggies//

//recipes//

//holistic//

2 weeks ago 5,073 notes via witchsmoke © plantial
kitchen-in-the-cottage:

Nutella Pie Pops by Call Me Cupcake
Ingredients:
200g flour
200g cold butter (cut in cubes)
Pinch of salt 
50 ml cold water
Nutella (or jam, berries, peanut butter)
Lollipop sticks (paper or wood, not plastic)
1 egg lightly beaten with a splash of milk
Granulated sugar to sprinkle
Directions:
Mix flour and salt in a bowl. Pinch together butter and flour mixture until grainy. Put into a chilled bowl. Add cold water and pinch together gently until a dough forms. Knead until just combined. Wrap dough in plastic and chill for at least 2 hours.
Heat oven to 350*F and line a sheet with parchment paper. Roll out dough on a floured surface to about 3.5mm thickness. Using a small circular cookie cutter, cut out as many circles as possible. Press remaining dough together and chill, then roll out and repeat.
Scoop Nutella (or filling of your choice) on one circle of dough, leaving an edge. Place a lollipop stick right in the middle (make sure it’s oven safe). Brush the edges with egg wash and top with another dough circle. Press edges together with a fork. Brush top with egg wash and sprinkle the sugar. Place on a baking sheet and bake for 15 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.

kitchen-in-the-cottage:

Nutella Pie Pops by Call Me Cupcake

Ingredients:

  • 200g flour
  • 200g cold butter (cut in cubes)
  • Pinch of salt 
  • 50 ml cold water
  • Nutella (or jam, berries, peanut butter)
  • Lollipop sticks (paper or wood, not plastic)
  • 1 egg lightly beaten with a splash of milk
  • Granulated sugar to sprinkle

Directions:

Mix flour and salt in a bowl. Pinch together butter and flour mixture until grainy. Put into a chilled bowl. Add cold water and pinch together gently until a dough forms. Knead until just combined. Wrap dough in plastic and chill for at least 2 hours.

Heat oven to 350*F and line a sheet with parchment paper. Roll out dough on a floured surface to about 3.5mm thickness. Using a small circular cookie cutter, cut out as many circles as possible. Press remaining dough together and chill, then roll out and repeat.

Scoop Nutella (or filling of your choice) on one circle of dough, leaving an edge. Place a lollipop stick right in the middle (make sure it’s oven safe). Brush the edges with egg wash and top with another dough circle. Press edges together with a fork. Brush top with egg wash and sprinkle the sugar. Place on a baking sheet and bake for 15 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.